Posts Tagged ‘Art’

WISH FOR KICKS ‘GIVING BACK’ TEE #WishForKicks

#NOWAVAILABLE @wishatl // #WishForKicks ‘Giving Back’ L/S TEE | $59 | IN-STORE + ONLINE ❤️ It’s always the season to give back! Our goal is to provide a pair of sneakers from Wish for each child & teen in the organization for the Holidays.

We added a new and fun way to give back! Cop a #WishForKicks Tee as an option to donate!
100% of the purchase will go towards a fresh pair of kicks for each teen/young adult at Chris180.

Art/Design: Alex Medina For Wish For Kicks, 2018.
Help us grant a WISH FOR KICKS today!
#WishForKicks #GiveBack #GivingTuesday
#SeasonOfGiving #GeorgiaGivesDay

The Moreland Marauders Project: The Artist – Brandon Sadler

In our quest to further examine the progression of Hip Hop, we’re continuing to explore Hip Hop’s core elements. Our next subject is Brandon Sadler, an artist who got his start in street art and is now growing a body of art in the contemporary collection of the High Museum. Sadler’s work can also be seen throughout Atlanta including his work along the Atlanta Beltline which is showcased in the images below. So take a look below as Brandon talks about his craft and models another one of the looks from our “Moreland Marauders” capsule:

Explain what doing your craft is like in today’s society with the advancement of technology, the internet, digital downloads, availability of information etc.? Do these elements prove as aids or obstacles?

I keep both doors open really, I stay true to a hands on approach and utilize the digital world as a tool and network. I prefer to work analog but the cyber tap is inevitable at this point, and it does allow a level of accessibility and impact that conventional approaches can’t provide. Successfully creating in today’s world requires balance, so in order to avoid succumbing to any one particular medium; I sharpen many techniques on the regular.
 
How has your craft changed since the inception of HipHop?

Well Hip Hop had already erupted by the time I was born in 86’, so what I became and what I do now is reflection of decades of Hip Hop influence.  My style is a symphony of different cultures and disciplines and it will develop continuously; the ability to observe, adapt, and master is the essence of Hip Hop culture.

How does your craft influence HipHop today and vice versa?

I can’t speak on my influence on Hip Hop. Its influence on me however, has been based in progressive forms of creativity, language, innovation, transformation, and style; I have shaped my artistic career on these principles.

For more information on Brandon Sadler or to see some of his work, visit http://www.risingredlotus.com/

WISH TRAVELS: Mike Kelley’s City 0000 @ David Zwirner Gallery

American artist Mike Kelley is the type of creative mind who has the ability to create works that seem to withstand the test of time. Unlike some whose works are based upon an era-specific trend or a fleeting fad, Kelley’s work – perhaps by virtue of its inherently humanistic approach – possesses a timeless value to it. Often pulling upon found objects to comprise his sculptures, one of Kelley’s most celebrated pieces is the one pictured here – City 0000. Currently on display at a group exhibition at New York’s David Zwirner Gallery, City 0000 poses a bright and bold contrast to the stark white walls and smooth concrete of the open space.

City 0000 depicts the fictitious city of Kandor, the birthplace of Superman on the planet Krypton. Cast in a bold, chromatic series of colors, City 0000 is made up from a translucent resin and lit by interior LED lights and the skyline is comprised of a glowing grouping of obelisks, towers, and pillars. Holding a particularly personal and special place within Kelley’s mind, Kandor reckons to his childhood in which – according to DC Comics – Kandor was a world that was miniaturized and stolen before Krypton was destroyed. For attendees of the group exhibition, City 0000 holds an even deeper value in light of Kelley’s recent death, bringing to light the melancholic juxtaposition of Kelley’s childhood imagination on display and the finite reality of the human life.

WISH TRAVELS: Jeff Koons “Gazing Ball” Exhibition @ David Zwirner

To say that American artist Jeff Koons is one of the most celebrated and successful artists of our day, would be an understatement. Not only has the Pennsylvania-born artist been pushed to the forefront via his individuals works through the years such as Puppy, Celebration series, his BMW Art Car and many, many more, but Koons has maintained a level of longevity and consistent relevance that is perhaps the harder facet of one’s artistic career to maintain. The latest work from Koons – appropriately titled Gazing Ball – is now on display and being housed within New York’s David Zwirner. Gazing Ball represents Koons inaugural exhibition with David Zwirner. While here in New York, we’ve been stooping through a series of galleries and creatives spaces — one of our first stops being Koons’ latest exhibition.

Koons, who often gathers much of his creative inspiration from various elements of contemporary consumer culture and modern everyday life, initiated Gazing Ball out of a retroactive look back at the mirrored spherical ornaments often found in suburban lawns in Koons childhood hometown of Pennsylvania. A relatively simple concept at first, Koons uses the spheres to explore the concept of trascendence while reflecting on the perspective of a phiiosophers gaze on life, mortality and the concept of eternality through form and ideas. Each blue-colored, hand blown gazing ball rests atop a variety of Greco-Roman antique statues that are juxtaposed alongside elements from modern society such as mailboxes and a birdbath. The concept is to present the time-and-date-centric elements of various eras against the gazing balls which seems to slide seamlessly into whichever period-setting they are displayed. Jeff Koons’ Gazing Ball will be on display at David Zwirner through June 29, 2013.

David Zwirner

525 & 533 West 19th Street

New York, NY 10011

adidas ‘Your Story’ – Consortium SS12

For all the creative art loving sneaker fans, we’ve go a treat for you.


Creative Director of Happy Socks,
Viktor Tell, teams up with adidas
Originals to create his own fun
version of the Matchplay. From the
outside the silhouette looks low
key with its mostly white canvas
upper, but it’s the small glimpses
of detail on the heel tab, ankle
padding and inside the shoe that
tell both the Olympic and Happy
Socks stories.

The Stockholm native took
inspiration from a Swedish air
pistol champion, and this
is achieved along the 3-stripes
with bullet hole inspired dots.
On one of the sockliners is a
Trefoil target marked LUFTPISTOL
(air pistol) and the other features
a lid for bullets. The ankle
padding and underside of the
tongue feature more brightly
coloured dots that make it
characteristically Happy Socks.

Perhaps one of boldest
interpretations for Consortium
SS 12 and one with some
serious attitude is the Pro Shell
by Kara Messina, London designer
and creative director of men’s
streetwear label Y’OH. There’s
a strong synergy with Messina
and the Pro Shell model; each
has carved their own place
in streetwear history.


Most of the upper is made
of engineered fabric with
a traditional African print in
leopard colours, and for Messina
this conjures thoughts of
competitiveness and the multi
cultural presence in both
Olympics and everyday London
life. The print continues through
to the laces and velcro strap, while
the rubber toebox and supersoft
leather heel patch and side panel
tone it down slightly in black.


What do you think about this story? Like the art? Let us know in the comments section.